A Taste of Knowledge – Traditional Desserts in Argentina, Translated & Explained

If you love sweets and are also intrigued by local food knowledge, Glutton Guide Buenos Aires has a treat for you! This list of delicious terms is every bit as sugary as it looks, and you’ll want to add everything to your culinary itinerary.

Diabetics beware: porteños have quite the sweet tooth and are unabashedly gluttonous when it comes to desserts. Classic Argentine cakes and pies are often local twists on European classics (usually gooier, sweeter and likely smothered in dulce de leche, or DDL). Expect to find DDL in places you never thought possible, as well as iterations of chocolate, meringue and fruits. And then there’s the helado (ice cream), which rounds out the Argentine holy trinity, right up there with Messi and the Pope.

Sweets Dictionary

Alfajores: two round cookies with DDL in between, either made with flour (harina) and covered in chocolate or powdered sugar, or with cornstarch (maicena) and rolled in toasted coconut

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Budín de pan: bread pudding

Chocotorta: a no-bake favorite at friendly gatherings made of Chocolinas cookies dunked in milk/coffee, with layers of DDL + cream cheese

Flan mixto: a typical flan or crème caramel with helpings of whipped cream and DDL

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Lemon pie: tart lemon pie with a generous portion of meringue on top

Membrillo: quince paste

Panqueques: a thin crepe filled with DDL or marmalade

Pasta frola: a pie with a lattice crust made with quince paste, sweet potato paste or guava jelly

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Postre vigilante or queso y dulce: thick slice of cheese accompanied with quince paste or sweet potato paste


Rogel: thin layers of puff pastry alternating with layers of DDL and topped with meringue


Is your mouth watering yet? You can find out the best places in Buenos Aires to eat every single one of these decadent desserts : just take a look at Glutton Guide Buenos Aires! You’ll be the life of the party! And your friends and family will be eternally indebted to you for introducing them to such heavenly, sugary goodness.

The Art of the Grape – Where to Find the Best Wine in Buenos Aires

If you’re one of those fancy wine connoisseurs, you’ll probably be interested in Glutton Guide Buenos Aires‘ list of the best wine in Buenos Aires! In a city full of culinary delights, your tongue is sure to be tickled.  

Aldo’s

 

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With over 600 wines on offer, this modern vinoteca in the center of the city is a great starting point to discover Argentine wines from the moment you walk in the door. Daily happy hour specials last from 5-9pm, and different wineries are featured every month. Whether it’s red, white or rosé, if you see something that strikes your fancy, take a bottle or two for later as prices are reasonable.

Anuva Wine Tastings


Oenophiles in Buenos Aires don’t want for chances to try local wine, but Anuva stands out as a complete wine tasting with generous pours. Guests taste five wines from boutique Argentine wineries paired with five traditional Argentine tapas (local cheeses, empanadas, etc). In a beautiful Palermo loft, a sommelier leads a chat on the wines, the vinification process and the history of wine in Argentina. As a bonus, wine is available for purchase and guests from the USA can have cases shipped back home. Or they can join Anuva’s wine club to receive small production Argentine wines every month. While pricier than some other tastings, guests always leave happy.

Bar du Marché

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On one of Palermo’s prettiest tree-lined blocks is this cozy café/wine bar whose mirrored walls, wicker chairs and wine list feel decidedly more parisien than porteño. With over 50 wines available by the glass, some of them imported, this is a great spot for a leisurely lunch, afternoon aperitif or wine and cheese flight paired by the sommelier. Behind the bar and up a flight of stairs is closed-door sushi bar, Omakase. It shares certain dishes and a wine menu, so you won’t need to venture far for an amazing meal. As a bonus, next door is Siete Spirits, a local gem of a wine shop specializing in New World wines. The shop even holds Thursday tastings on their latest acquisitions!

Casa Coupage

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Part closed-door restaurant, part tasting club, this innovative oenogastronomic space was founded on an appreciation for local wine and cuisine. Owners and staff are all sommeliers who make each experience memorable down to the last detail. From the décor of the beautifully renovated Palermo home to sensory surprises between courses, Casa Coupage impresses. The owner curates blind tastings with food pairings monthly, but space is limited to 20 people and spots go quickly. It is easier to secure a table for dinner, where the menu evolves according to the season and inspiration of the chef. Diners can choose from a wine flight of three, five or seven wines to accompany a prix fixe menu or order à la carte.

Gran Bar Danzón


By now a staple in the city, this bar/lounge/restaurant seems to do it all with plenty of panache, as is evidenced by the crowds who turn out night after night. The wine list is impressive, the cocktails are creative and the food is tasty, with an emphasis on seafood and sushi. Arrive early to beat the crowd and take advantage of happy hour specials (which last for the first two hours after opening). With so many options, you may rack up a hefty tab otherwise.

Pain et Vin

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The lovechild of an Argento-Israeli couple, Pain et Vin is a simple yet soulful wine bar and bakery. Eleonora is a sommelier who curates an eclectic wall of wine. Meanwhile, Ohad prefers to remain in the back, churning out homemade sourdough bread from the oven they built from scratch. For lunch or dinner, they have sandwiches, salads and snacks that perfectly accompany the vino. In addition to tasting wine by the glass or taking a bottle to go, they also frequently hold wine tastings from some of the best wineries around. If your Spanish is not up to snuff, don’t let that hold you back! Pain et Vin will always accommodate an English-speaking audience. Check their Facebook page for upcoming events.

Are you craving some nice local snacks to go along with your wine? Be sure to check out Glutton Guide Buenos Aires for a list of surefire winners! 

The Facts about Facturas – Buenos Aires Desserts’ Double Meanings

The only thing that comes close to being as satisfying as desserts are facts about desserts! Want to know why Buenos Aire’s facturas have evocative names like nun’s sigh or friar’s balls? If you’re keen to hear about the cultural context of Argentinian desserts, this informative post by Glutton Guide Buenos Aires will satisfy your cravings.

Ever thought of eating a friar’s balls (bolas del fraile) for breakfast? In typical lunfardo fashion, words have an often-ironic double meaning. In the late 19th century, Italian anarchists (some of whom also happened to be bakers) hiding out in Argentina started organizing anarchist resistance groups and published the newsletter El Obrero Panadero (The Bakery Worker). As a form of resistance against the government, police and Catholic Church, they started giving sarcastic names to their baked goods to taunt the powers they protested. Which is why no porteño will think twice about asking the baker for a nun’s sigh (suspiro de monja) to accompany his café. Facturas tend to be quite heavy and sweet – many are sugar glazed and/or filled with pastry cream, dulce de leche or membrillo (quince paste). The rebellious bakers have long since gone but the names have stayed.

Some of the most common factura names include:

Bolas del fraile (friar’s balls): pastry balls filled with dulce de leche or pastry cream

Cañoncitos (little cannons): puff pastry tubes filled with dulce de leche

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Medialunas (half moons): small, dense croissants (but don’t call them that!) that come in two varieties (medialunas de manteca, a flakier version made with lard, and medialunas de grasa, made with butter and topped with a sweet glaze), which are sold plain, made into sandwiches or stuffed with dulce de leche or pastry cream

Moño con membrillo y crema pastelera: “bow ties” with quince paste and pastry cream

Pañuelitos de grasa (fat wipes): layers of puff pastry

Suspiro de monja (nun’s sigh): pastry balls filled with pastry cream and covered with sugar

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Tortita negra (small black pastry): small round pastry covered with dark brown sugar vigilantes: long, thin puff pastry with a sweet glaze


The thought of anarchist bakers is simply intriguing (as are the pastries themselves.) If you want to find out for yourself what they taste like, or if you want something savory beforehand, check out Glutton Guide Buenos Aires! It will steer you in the right direct and ensure that you’re having only the best friar’s balls. 

What Are Pinguinos? (And Why is Wine Served in Them in Buenos Aires?!)

pinguinos wine

Food (and drink) culture can sometimes be very specific! Glutton Guide Buenos Aires is here to teach you all about an interesting tradition involving wine and penguins (pinguinos).

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Visitors are in for a kitschy surprise when ordering a house wine at some traditional restaurants – it will likely appear in a penguin-shaped pitcher. But for such a ubiquitous table item, little is known about its origins or why it is a penguin. Aluminum pinguïnos started appearing on Buenos Aires tables around 1940. Wine from Mendoza was often cut with water or soda and then placed into these jugs. Thankfully, restaurants have stopped mixing other substances in the wine and the presence of the (now porcelain) penguin is more nostalgic than functional. Older Argentines still associate penguins with terrible wine, but, like many vintage items, they have come back into fashion as retro. A walk around Palermo boutiques and about 200 pesos will score you one to take back home. Catering to tourists, they come in different sizes and various colors.

In other words, wine and penguins don’t actually have anything in common, but pinguinos are a great wine jug and an even better present to take home from your Buenos Aires trip! But it sure is amusing to learn about the nostalgic and unique culinary traditions of Buenos Aires. If you’re keen to learn more about the food culture in this vibrant city, check out Glutton Guide Buenos Aires! You’ll get to conduct some first-hand research… by eating everything. 

Hungry for More? Read Buenos Aires’ Best Food Books!

Read your way through Glutton Guide Buenos Aires: The Hungry Traveler’s Guidebook, but still want more? Dig into these food books on Buenos Aires and Argentinian cuisine. Don’t even think about reading them on an empty stomach!

bodegones

Bodegones of Buenos Aires 

Food critic and writer Pietro Sorba’s book is an indispensable guide for anyone interested in traditional porteño restaurants (bodegones). He defines bodegones as sharing the following in common: abundant portions, Spanish/Italian influences, years of history, affordable prices and professional waiters. His passion for the subject is evident; the descriptions read like short love letters. This book is just one in a series of food guides covering pizzerias, parrillas and many more. This book is available in a bilingual Spanish/English edition. More info.  

The Food and Cooking Of Argentina: 65 Traditional Recipes from the Heart of South America 

Whether you’re missing the flavors from Argentina or too poor to buy a ticket in the first place, this go-to cookbook will bring Argentina to you. With 65 recipes, BA native Chef Cesar Bartolini covers all the classics from empanadas to locro to DIY dulce de leche. Happy cooking! More info.  

creating_a_common_table_in_twentieth-century_argen-pite_rebekah_e-21514029-3323719528-frntl

Creating a Common Table in Twentieth-Century Argentina: Doña Petrona, Women, and Food 

Doña Petrona is one of the most famous Argentine women and author of the voluminous cookbook El Gran Libro de Doña Petrona. The book is found in almost every Argentina home. Author Rebekah E. Pite illuminates the fascinating intersection of gender roles, food, history and economic development in 20th century Argentina. More info

Seven Fires: Grilling the Argentine Way 

Argentina’s star chef and grill master Francis Mallmann’s first book is an ode to fire and traditional cooking techniques from his native Patagonia. While not everyone has room to cook an entire cow at home, Mallmann offers his classic recipes with twists for an indoor kitchen and a how-to guide for a proper Sunday asado. More info.  

Check out Mallmann’s episode on the sensually-shot Netflix documentary series Chef’s Table. His romantic personality shines through. Even the staunchest urbanites will be left wanting to catch and cook a fish over an open fire in remote Patagonia. More info.

Vino Argentino: An Insider’s Guide to the Wines and Wine Country of Argentina 

If you are looking to learn more about Argentine vino and terroir, who better than to consult than Laura Catena? The fourth generation of an Italo-Argentine winemaking family, Catena is also the president of famed winery Bodega Catena Zapata. The book explores the history of wine in Argentina and its regions and varietals. After reading, you will make you want to book a flight to Mendoza immediately. She also shares recipes of classic Argentine dishes to pair perfectly with a bottle of Malbec or Torrontés. More info 

Download your copy of Glutton Guide Buenos Aires, and start eating like a local today!

The Best Pizza in Buenos Aires

One of the three staples of porteño cuisine, pizza is something of a local obsession in Buenos Aires. Argies love to eat pizza seated or standing, at home or out, drunk or sober, at any time of day. There is pizza to please any palate in this city, but the classic Argentine-style pizza is a cheesy, doughy slice of steaming mozzarella (muza, for short). Here are the best pizzas in Buenos Aires:

Güerrin

 

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Avenida Corrientes, the location of the pizza walk, is ground zero for the best pizzerias in Buenos Aires, and Güerrin is the center of the street. Founded in 1932 by Italian immigrants, Güerrin is a bustling pizza parlor, where guests can peer into the oven as pizzas are churned out and quickly enjoy their pies either standing at the original bar or seated in the restaurant in the back. Original fixings, pizza boxes stacked to the ceiling and waiters in checkered uniforms yelling out orders create a charming kind of chaos emblematic of Buenos Aires.

Order: muza, fainá (flatbread made from garbanzo beans often put on top of pizza)

Corrientes 1368. Subte: Line D – 9 de Julio or Tribunales/Line B – C Pellegrini or Uruguay. Tel: +54 11 4371 8141. Hours: 8am-close. Menu: Spanish only. Web: www.pizzeriaguerrin.com

Siamo nel Forno

 

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If authentic Neapolitan pizza in Buenos Aires is what you’re craving, then get thee to Siamo nel Forno. They have a certified Neapolitan wood-burning oven carefully baking gourmet thin crust pies night after night – and it is one of the best pizzas in Buenos Aires. The best course of action is to go with good company and split everything family style, accompanied by a bottle of local wine, craft beer or an Aperol spritz.

Order: burrata, pizza margherita, pizza spinachi, pizza of the day

Costa Rica 5886. Subte: Line D – Ministro Carranza. Tel: +54 11 4775 0337. Hours: Tue-Sun 8pm-1am. Menu: Spanish, English & Italian. Web: www.facebook.com/pages/Siamo-Nel-Forno

For more info on the best places to eat and drink in BA and more of Buenos Aires’ best pizza joints, download your copy of Glutton Guide Buenos Aires: The Hungry Traveler’s Guidebook and start eating like a local.

Best Ñoquis (Gnocchi) in Buenos Aires

If it is the 29th of any month, you will find many Argentines eating ñoquis (gnocchi) smothered in tomato sauce, either at home or at one of the multitude of Italian restaurants. Like any longstanding tradition, there is debate about its origins, with one claim dating back to St. Pantaleon’s pilgrimage through Italy in the eighth century. The more common belief is that Italian immigrants made gnocchi when resources were stretched at the end of the month, since potatoes and flour are both inexpensive and filling. Superstitious folks place money under their plate for good luck in the coming month – some claim you have to carry the money with you and others that it must be donated for future prosperity. However, ñoqui isn’t just pasta. In local Buenos Aires slang it is also a derogatory term for public employees and/ or people who don’t go to work, but appear at the end of the month just in time to collect a paycheck.

Cucina Paradiso

Walking into Donato De Santis’ restaurants in Buenos Aires is like stepping into Italy – a warm atmosphere, respect for tradition and the best quality ingredients. His accessibility belies the fact that this Milan-born chef has cooked for jetsetters from LA to Miami and was once Gianni Versace’s personal chef in New York. Cucina Paradiso is a one-stop shop at any time of day for an Italian fix – seasonal homemade pastas (including the famous gnocchi) for lunch, two-for-one aperitivos at happy hour or an afternoon espresso and dessert – no reservations required. Its walls are also lined with imported Italian products to take home that are not always easy to find elsewhere in Buenos Aires.

Belgrano location: Castañeda 1873. Train: Line Belgrano Norte – Scalabrini Ortiz. Tel: +54 11 4780 2409. Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-midnight.

Palermo Hollywood location: Arévalo 1538. Subte: Line D – Ministro Carranza. Tel: +54 11 4770 9406. Hours: Mon-Tue 10am-10pm, Wed-Sat 10am-midnight. 

Menu: Spanish & Italian. Web: www.cucinaparadiso.com

Guido

Tucked in a quieter part of Palermo near the zoo is Guido, a dimly lit Italian restaurant with checkered tablecloths and opinionated wait staff that will joke about anything but the food. Homemade pastas, including the gnocchi, are served family style, perfect to order a few and share with good company, which locals have been doing for years as evidenced by the photos lining the walls. While waiting for a table, the large wooden bar is the perfect place to strike up a conversation with a regular while sipping on a Cinzano. Feel free to linger over dinner, dessert and drinks because Guido is open late even by Buenos Aires standards, making it a low-key yet entertaining night shared with friends old or new.

Cerviño 3943. Subte: Line D – Plaza Italia. Tel: +54 15 4802 1262. Hours: Tue-Sun 7pm-3am. Menu: Spanish & English. Web: www.guidorestaurant.com.ar

Il Ballo del Mattone

Part art gallery, part music venue, part eatery, this eclectic trattoria is unlike any other in town, serving Italian food in a lively yet intimate atmosphere. Lines are blurred between indoor and outdoor space, as well as public and private – with stylized family portraits hanging from the walls and family members passing through to their living quarters upstairs. The hip wait staff haul the menu to your table on an oversized blackboard, dodging sculptures, the live band and trays of homemade gnocchi along the way, in a cheery chaos emblematic of BA. In addition to this Il Ballo del Mattone Originale, named after a 1960s Rita Pavone song, the energetic artist owners also have two more restaurants nearby (Trastevere on Gorriti 5893 and Trinacria on Carranza 1601), are involved in local music and food festivals, teach Italian classes and even host film screenings and a radio show (Mattone Radio) five nights a week, expanding their Pequeña Italia (Little Italy) cultural empire all over town.

Gorriti 5737. Subte: Line B – Dorrego/Line D – Ministro Carranza. Tel: +54 15 4776 4247. Hours: Mon-Sat noon-4pm & 8pm-close, Sun 8pm-close. Menu: Spanish & Italian. Web: www.ilballodelmattone.com

In Bocca al Lupo

Don’t let your mediocre Italian skills scare you away from this neighborhood café because the name “into the wolf’s mouth” is actually an Italian idiom to wish someone good luck, akin to “break a leg”. The only luck you’ll need here is choosing what delicious dish to order; from the homemade pastas to the tasty tarts on display, the choice is not an easy one. Owner and Illy educator Enrico Aguggiaro personally ensures that espressos and cappuccinos are executed to perfection, just like in his native Italy. The cheerful, airy décor and friendly staff make it the perfect low-key spot to spend time reading or relaxing in the enclosed patio while trying a bowl of gnocchi. Depending on the time of day, opt for a fixed menu, especially if it includes their freshly squeezed orange juice. If you need even more reasons to stay, Bocca offers both Italian language and coffee education classes as well as a selection of Italian products for sale in front.

Map. Bonpland 1965. Subte: Line D – Ministro Carranza. Tel: +54 11 4774 3692. Hours: Tue-Fri 9am-8pm, Sat-Sun 9:30am-8pm. Menu: Spanish, Italian & English. Web: www.facebook.com/inboccaallupocaffe

For more info on Buenos Aires’ best gnocchi and how to eat and drink like a local, download your copy of Glutton Guide Buenos Aires: The Hungry Traveler’s Guidebook. May your hungerlust never be sated!

Best Dulce De Leche Desserts in Buenos Aires

Though it is definitely socially acceptable to eat spoonfuls of dulce de leche straight from the jar in Buenos Aires, it’s more of an ingredient than a standalone dessert and can be enjoyed at any meal of the day on toast, bread pudding, chocolates, crepes, pastries, cakes, ice cream or even in coffee. Popular all over Latin America, it’s also known as manjar, arequipe or cajeta, and is a spreadable confection made from slowly heating sweetened milk until the water evaporates, leaving the sticky “sweet of milk”. Try making it at home, but be prepared for hours of stirring over the stove. Different countries lay claim to inventing dulce de leche, but in Buenos Aires it is best to agree on the Argentine origins story unless you want to start a continental conflict.

Here’s the best places to find dulce de leche in Buenos Aires favorite places to pick up a DDL dessert:

Bar du Marché

On one of Palermo’s prettiest tree-lined blocks is this cozy café/wine bar whose mirrored walls, wicker chairs and wine list feel decidedly more parisien than porteño. With over 50 wines available by the glass, some of them imported, this is a great spot for a leisurely lunch, afternoon aperitif or wine and cheese flight paired by the sommelier. Do not miss their mousse de dulce de leche, an extra creamy DDL mousse that is to die for.

Nicaragua 5946. Subte: Line D – Ministro Carranza. Tel: +54 11 4778 1050. Hours: Mon-Sat 9:30am-12am. Web: www.bardumarchepalermo.com

Don Julio

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Dulce de leche at a parrilla? Dulce de leche-stuffed crepes are actually the best way to end a night of feasting on meats from an open grill, and no one does panqueques de dulce de leche better than Don Julio. In 2015, Latin America’s 50 Best Restaurants recognized their outstanding meat and dessert game, naming them the 45th best restaurant in the region. Expect long waits (eased with complimentary bubbles), but it’s totally worth it.

Guatemala 4691. Subte: Line D – Scalabrini Ortiz. Tel: +54 11 4831 9564 / 4832 6058. Hours: 12-4 pm, 7pm-close. Menu: Spanish & English. Web: www.parrilladonjulio.com.ar.

Freddo

Freddo’s black, white and blue logo is part of the porteño landscape, with over 150 locales in BA and beyond. Opened in 1969, they are the largest chain of heladería in Buenos Aires and their name is practically synonymous with ice cream. They have a huge offering of flavors as well as sundaes, smoothies, blended drinks and more. Try classics like dulce de leche helado (ice cream) to see what all the fuss is about.

See website for locations all around town. Tel: +54 0810 3337 3336. Web: www.freddo.com.ar

Maru Botana

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Celebrity chef and TV personality Maru Botana has been busy, growing her gastronomic empire to include successful TV shows, cookbooks, a catering business and eponymous brick & mortar locales, while also raising seven children. Her outposts offer savory items like quiches, salads and sandwiches, but they’re only a precursor to the main course: dessert. A glance at the DDL-loaded pastry case alone may send you into hyperglycemic shock. You can’t miss Rogel, Marquise de chocolate con dulce de leche, crema y frutos rojos (chocolate marquise with DDL, whipped cream and berries) or the dulce de leche cheesecake.

BEL Location: 11 de Septiembre 982. Line D – Juramento. Tel: +54 9 11 4772 2478.

Second BEL Location: Echeverría 3240. Subte: Line D – Juramento. Tel: +54 9 11 4551 8887.

R+R Location: Suipacha 1371. Subte: Line C – San Martín. Tel: +54 9 11 4326 7134.

Hours: Mon-Sat: 8am-8:30pm, Sun 9am-8pm. Web: www.marubotana.com

Un’Altra Volta

Commonly just known as Volta, this local artisanal helado (ice cream) chain has a modern, sleek aesthetic. Try a combo of any of the classics, but don’t miss the DDL.

Libertador 3060. Subte: Line D – Plaza Italia. Tel: +54 11 1088 8622. Hours: Sun-Thu 8am-2am, Fri 8am-3am, Sat 8am-4am. Web: www.unaltravolta.com.ar/english

For more info on the best dulce de leche in Buenos Aires and other sweet spots, download your copy of Glutton Guide Buenos Aires: The Hungry Traveler’s Guidebook and start eating like a local!

Best Places to Dine Solo in Buenos Aires

Traveling solo in BA? Here’s some of the best places to dine alone when you’re in town. Or if you’re looking to meet similarly food-focused friends while visiting the city, download Glutton Guide Buenos Aires and explore the Food Activities chapter. Through the cultural lens of food tours, cooking classes, wine experiences and more, you’ll meet plenty of travelers who you can split the bill with.

Dogg

Argentines have been eating panchos (hot dogs) for a long time, but Dogg elevated the mediocre, on-the-go snack from the kiosko to a gourmet mid-day meal. Catering to the downtown crowd, Dogg offers freshly grilled hot dogs, made from a family recipe dating back to 1920s Brooklyn. In the spirit of a real American hot dog, eaters can choose from a variety of combos or create their own – all from the high, communal tables that are perfect for dining solo (or meeting new friends over a hot dog).

San Martín 657. Subte: Line B – Florida / Line C – Lavalle. Tel: +54 11 4313 9735. Hours: Mon 10am-5pm, Tue-Fri 10am-8:30pm. Menu: Spanish only. Web: www.dogghouse.com.ar

Fukuro Noodle Bar

Since 2013, Fukuro has filled a gap in the BA food scene to the delight of Asian food lovers. Everything on the small, curated menu is made from scratch with love, down to the alkaline noodles and secret spicy sauce. Owners (and spouses) Vanessa and Matías Camozzi travelled the world specifically to learn from the best and create their own Taiwanese/Japanese fusion in Palermo, offering dumplings, steamed buns and ramen as well as sake and local artisanal beer. The décor is as colorful as the food is tasty, complete with original stencil art by local graffiti artist Cabaio, a sleek bar at which to slurp ramen and a plant-filled patio. It is also a great place for solo diners to eat in peace or sit at the bar and make new friends.

Costa Rica 5514. Subte: Line D – Palermo. Tel: +54 15 3290 0912. Hours: Tue-Thu 8pm-midnight, Fri-Sat 8pm-1am. Menu: Spanish & English. Web: www.fukuronoodlebar.com

Güerrin

Avenida Corrientes, the location of the pizza walk, is ground zero for traditional pizzerias, thanks to the neighboring theater-going crowd who needed something cheap, quick and delicious to eat – whether with a group or dining solo in Buenos Aires. And Güerrin is the center of the street. Founded in 1932 by Italian immigrants, Güerrin is a bustling pizza parlor, where guests can peer into the oven as pizzas are churned out and quickly enjoyed their pies either standing at the original bar or seated in the restaurant in the back. Original fixings, pizza boxes stacked to the ceiling and waiters in checkered uniforms yelling out orders create a charming kind of chaos emblematic of Buenos Aires.

Corrientes 1368. Subte: Line D – 9 de Julio or Tribunales / Line B – C Pellegrini. Tel: +54 11 4371 8141. Hours: 8am-close. Menu: Spanish only. Web: www.pizzeriaguerrin.com

In Bocca al Lupo

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Don’t let your mediocre Italian skills scare you away from this neighborhood café because the name “into the wolf’s mouth” is actually an Italian idiom to wish someone good luck, akin to “break a leg”. The only luck you’ll need here is choosing what delicious dish to order; from the homemade pastas to the tasty tarts on display, the choice is not an easy one. Owner and Illy educator Enrico Aguggiaro personally ensures that espressos and cappuccinos are executed to perfection, just like in his native Italy. The cheerful, airy décor and friendly staff make it the perfect low-key spot to spend time reading or relaxing in the enclosed patio. Depending on the time of day, opt for a fixed menu, especially if it includes their freshly squeezed orange juice. If you need even more reasons to stay, Bocca offers both Italian language and coffee education classes as well as a selection of Italian products for sale in front.

Bonpland 1965. Subte: Line D – Ministro Carranza. Tel: +54 11 4774 3692. Hours: Tue-Fri 9am-8pm, Sat-Sun 9:30am-8pm. Menu: Spanish, Italian & English. Web: www.facebook.com/inboccaallupocaffe

LAB Tostadores de Café

After opening in 2014, LAB quickly developed a dedicated following of coffee heads. Taking the art of coffee to scientific levels, LAB honors its name as expert baristas use all the tricks up their sleeve to meticulously prepare every beverage. All the classic options are on offer in addition to their in-house experiments, such as the “Mocha by LAB” (double shot of espresso + foamed milk + dark chocolate). Geeky gadgetry adorns the sleek two-floor interior: downstairs functions as the café while upstairs is reserved for education, which ranges from casual coffee appreciation to professional barista courses. While they don’t have a full food menu, their American-style homemade cookies and pastries can’t be beat, and the environment lends itself perfectly to solo sipping. The only thing missing are the white lab coats.

Humboldt 1542. Subte: Line D – Palermo. Tel: +54 11 4843 1790. Hours: Mon-Fri 8am-8pm, Sat 10am-8pm. Menu: Spanish & English. Web: www.labcafe.com.ar

MEME Sopa & Roll

Channeling a bit of that rebellious rock and roll spirit, this great little daytime joint goes against the grain in a land of meat and pasta and offers a world tour of flavors. Perfect for a light, solo lunch, the menu changes with the seasons and offers hot and cold soups and rolls, drawing on recipes from around the globe. Indecisive eaters can mix and match menu items or go for a three-soup tasting flight. Service is friendly and presentation is impeccable, with special garnishes for each dish to flavor to your liking.

Gorriti 5881. Subte: Line D – Ministro Carranza. Tel: +54 11 4770 9234. Hours: Wed-Mon 11am-8pm. Menu: Spanish & English. Web: www.facebook.com/meme.resto

Mercadito Latino

Conveniently located across from the San Telmo Market, Mercadito Latino is the perfect place to pop in for a snack or meal after working up an appetite browsing the antique dealers and weekend vendors in the neighborhood. Unpretentious and cozy, this lively little spot offers Latin American food and drinks from Mexico to Brazil and everywhere in between. The menu changes from time to time, but offerings always vary in terms of spice level, region of origin and ingredients. Try to snag one of the outdoor tables for a side of people watching with your margarita.

Carlos Calvo 488. Subte: Line C/E – Independencia. Tel: +54 15 2004 1056. Hours: Tue-Sun 10am-midnight. Menu: Spanish only. Web: www.facebook.com/mercaditol

NOLA

Anyone craving Southern food need not look any further than NOLA, a Cajun gastro-pub with the best gumbo in town thanks to a New Orleans native running the kitchen. The ambiance is warm and casual, with indoor and outdoor seating and touches of the Big Easy throughout, like Café du Monde tins and Mardi Gras beads. Like any good American joint, they offer an early (for Argie standards) happy hour from 5-8pm. New to NOLA? Go early, pull up at stool at the bar and order the famed fried chicken + pint of Bröeder’s, a local craft beer made by the chef’s partner and his brother.

Gorriti 4389. Subte: Line D – Scalabrini Ortiz. Tel: +54 11 6350 1704. Hours: Wed-Mon 5pm-midnight. Menu: Spanglish. Web: www.nolabuenosaires.com

Sagardi

A photo posted by Giovanni Vreugd (@mrsirgio308) on

Stepping into Sagardi feels more like San Sebastián than San Telmo, starting with its location in a beautiful old building on a cobblestone street across from a colonial church. Like many restaurants in Spain, it is divided into two separate dining areas – the more casual fare at the bar in front and the sit-down restaurant with elaborate dishes in the back. Food lovers will delight in sitting at the beautiful wooden bar covered with cold pintxos (tapas) and grabbing hot pintxos as they emerge from the kitchen. Some of the classics are there, like the omnipresent tortilla de papas (Spanish tortilla), but absent are the more exotic sea creatures emblematic of Basque cuisine. If you resist the temptation to fill up on tapas in front, the dining room in the back awaits with even more culinary delights. The former is a great option for solo dining in Buenos Aires. Don’t forget to save your toothpicks until you’re done in order to settle up at the bar.

Humberto Primo 319. Subte: Line C – San Juan. Tel: +54 11 4361 2538. Hours: Bar: 11am-midnight, Restaurant: Mon-Sat 1-4pm & 8pm-midnight, Sun 12:30pm-midnight. Menu: Spanish & English. Web: www.sagardi.com.ar

Looking for more info on the best places to eat and drink in BA? Download Glutton Guide Buenos Aires and you’ll stop eating like a tourist, and start eating with locals.

 

Glutton Guide Buenos Aires Launches – Dulce De Leche for EVERYONE!

Want to experience the best there is to eat (and drink) in the land of parilla, helado and Malbec? Look no further than Glutton Guide Buenos Aires: The Hungry Traveler’s Guidebook.

Glutton Guide Buenos Aires coverGlutton Guide Buenos Aires is written by Caitlin McCann, a writer, phothttp://www.gluttonguides.com/product/buenosaires/ographer and blogger who moved to Buenos Aires in 2012, tasting everything the city had to offer. Fluent in Spanish and married to a porteño, Caitlin has an insider’s view of the local food scene.

“My love affair with Argentine cuisine began in college with my first bite into dulce de leche-filled alfajores. Now, with Glutton Guide, I’ve put together everything a visitor to BA will need to plan a memorable meal-based trip, highlighting the city’s most delicious foods,” Caitlin says. “Whether you’re looking for the best way to order your steak at a parilla or a how-to guide to survive a night of partying (the siesta is just the beginning), Glutton Guide will make sure you make the most of every bite in BA.”

Glutton Guide goes beyond simple restaurant listings by providing a comprehensive look at the city’s dining scene. The Buenos Aires edition covers everything from the best merienda spots in the city to local dining trends to can’t-miss food-related activities — plus everything in between, including the city’s best bars and handy translations to help readers navigate the dining scene.

Download your copy of Glutton Guide Buenos Aires: The Hungry Traveler’s Guidebook from our website or Amazon’s Kindle store and start eating like a local.