The Art of the Grape – Where to Find the Best Wine in Buenos Aires

If you’re one of those fancy wine connoisseurs, you’ll probably be interested in Glutton Guide Buenos Aires‘ list of the best wine in Buenos Aires! In a city full of culinary delights, your tongue is sure to be tickled.  

Aldo’s

 

A post shared by @enriquesack on


With over 600 wines on offer, this modern vinoteca in the center of the city is a great starting point to discover Argentine wines from the moment you walk in the door. Daily happy hour specials last from 5-9pm, and different wineries are featured every month. Whether it’s red, white or rosé, if you see something that strikes your fancy, take a bottle or two for later as prices are reasonable.

Anuva Wine Tastings


Oenophiles in Buenos Aires don’t want for chances to try local wine, but Anuva stands out as a complete wine tasting with generous pours. Guests taste five wines from boutique Argentine wineries paired with five traditional Argentine tapas (local cheeses, empanadas, etc). In a beautiful Palermo loft, a sommelier leads a chat on the wines, the vinification process and the history of wine in Argentina. As a bonus, wine is available for purchase and guests from the USA can have cases shipped back home. Or they can join Anuva’s wine club to receive small production Argentine wines every month. While pricier than some other tastings, guests always leave happy.

Bar du Marché

A post shared by ⚓️ (@gonchi) on


On one of Palermo’s prettiest tree-lined blocks is this cozy café/wine bar whose mirrored walls, wicker chairs and wine list feel decidedly more parisien than porteño. With over 50 wines available by the glass, some of them imported, this is a great spot for a leisurely lunch, afternoon aperitif or wine and cheese flight paired by the sommelier. Behind the bar and up a flight of stairs is closed-door sushi bar, Omakase. It shares certain dishes and a wine menu, so you won’t need to venture far for an amazing meal. As a bonus, next door is Siete Spirits, a local gem of a wine shop specializing in New World wines. The shop even holds Thursday tastings on their latest acquisitions!

Casa Coupage

A post shared by Casa Coupage (@casa_coupage) on


Part closed-door restaurant, part tasting club, this innovative oenogastronomic space was founded on an appreciation for local wine and cuisine. Owners and staff are all sommeliers who make each experience memorable down to the last detail. From the décor of the beautifully renovated Palermo home to sensory surprises between courses, Casa Coupage impresses. The owner curates blind tastings with food pairings monthly, but space is limited to 20 people and spots go quickly. It is easier to secure a table for dinner, where the menu evolves according to the season and inspiration of the chef. Diners can choose from a wine flight of three, five or seven wines to accompany a prix fixe menu or order à la carte.

Gran Bar Danzón


By now a staple in the city, this bar/lounge/restaurant seems to do it all with plenty of panache, as is evidenced by the crowds who turn out night after night. The wine list is impressive, the cocktails are creative and the food is tasty, with an emphasis on seafood and sushi. Arrive early to beat the crowd and take advantage of happy hour specials (which last for the first two hours after opening). With so many options, you may rack up a hefty tab otherwise.

Pain et Vin

A post shared by Pain et Vin (@painetvin) on


The lovechild of an Argento-Israeli couple, Pain et Vin is a simple yet soulful wine bar and bakery. Eleonora is a sommelier who curates an eclectic wall of wine. Meanwhile, Ohad prefers to remain in the back, churning out homemade sourdough bread from the oven they built from scratch. For lunch or dinner, they have sandwiches, salads and snacks that perfectly accompany the vino. In addition to tasting wine by the glass or taking a bottle to go, they also frequently hold wine tastings from some of the best wineries around. If your Spanish is not up to snuff, don’t let that hold you back! Pain et Vin will always accommodate an English-speaking audience. Check their Facebook page for upcoming events.

Are you craving some nice local snacks to go along with your wine? Be sure to check out Glutton Guide Buenos Aires for a list of surefire winners! 

What Are Pinguinos? (And Why is Wine Served in Them in Buenos Aires?!)

pinguinos wine

Food (and drink) culture can sometimes be very specific! Glutton Guide Buenos Aires is here to teach you all about an interesting tradition involving wine and penguins (pinguinos).

A post shared by Diego Irato (@diegoirato) on

Visitors are in for a kitschy surprise when ordering a house wine at some traditional restaurants – it will likely appear in a penguin-shaped pitcher. But for such a ubiquitous table item, little is known about its origins or why it is a penguin. Aluminum pinguïnos started appearing on Buenos Aires tables around 1940. Wine from Mendoza was often cut with water or soda and then placed into these jugs. Thankfully, restaurants have stopped mixing other substances in the wine and the presence of the (now porcelain) penguin is more nostalgic than functional. Older Argentines still associate penguins with terrible wine, but, like many vintage items, they have come back into fashion as retro. A walk around Palermo boutiques and about 200 pesos will score you one to take back home. Catering to tourists, they come in different sizes and various colors.

In other words, wine and penguins don’t actually have anything in common, but pinguinos are a great wine jug and an even better present to take home from your Buenos Aires trip! But it sure is amusing to learn about the nostalgic and unique culinary traditions of Buenos Aires. If you’re keen to learn more about the food culture in this vibrant city, check out Glutton Guide Buenos Aires! You’ll get to conduct some first-hand research… by eating everything. 

Buenos Aires Best Happy Hours

Whether it’s relaxing after a hard day of work or chilling on the weekend, everybody deserves to treat themselves to nice happy hour. These Buenos Aires bars will welcome you for any occasion!

Antares

This local brewery has exploded in popularity and now has locations around the country, including three in BA at last count. They offer a range of styles from stout to porter to honey beer as well as fan favorite IPA. With two-for-one happy hour specials, tasty finger foods and a lively atmosphere, Antares is a great intro to the local craft beer scene. Seating is first come first serve, so get there early to beat the line that often stretches out the door. If you like what you taste, botellónes are also available to take home. They’ve got two for one pints every day before 8 pm, and on Sunday feature live music at select locations! 

PLM Location: Arévalo 2876. Subte: Line D – Ministro Carranza. Tel: +54 11 4772 2133. Hours: Mon-Fri 6pm-close, Sat & Sun 7pm-close.

PS Location: Armenia 1447. Subte: Line D – Scalabrini Ortíz. Tel: +54 11 4833 9611. Hours: Mon, Wed-Thurs & Sat-Sun 7pm-close, Tue & Fri 6pm-close.

ST Location: Bolívar 491. Subte: Line E – Belgrano. Tel: +54 11 4342 3836. Hours: 5pm-close. Web: www.cervezaantares.com.ar

Bar du Marché

On one of Palermo’s prettiest tree-lined blocks is this cozy café/wine bar whose mirrored walls, wicker chairs and wine list feel decidedly more parisien than porteño. With over 50 wines available by the glass, some of them imported, this is a great spot for a leisurely lunch, afternoon aperitif or wine and cheese flight paired by the sommelier. Behind the bar and up a flight of stairs is closed-door sushi bar Omakase, which shares certain dishes and a wine menu, so you won’t need to venture far for an amazing meal. As an added bonus, next door is Siete Spirits (Nicaragua 5942, www.sietespirits.com), a local gem of a wine shop specializing in New World wines, which holds Thursday tastings on their latest acquisitions.

Nicaragua 5946. Subte: Line D – Ministro Carranza. Tel: +54 11 4778 1050. Hours: Mon-Sat 9:30am-12am. Web: www.bardumarchepalermo.com

Gran Bar Danzón

By now a staple in the city, this bar/lounge/restaurant seems to do it all with plenty of panache, as evidenced by the crowds who turn out night after night. The wine list is impressive, the cocktails are creative and the food is tasty, with an emphasis on seafood and sushi. Arrive early to beat the crowd and take advantage of happy hour specials (which last for the first two hours after opening) because with so many options, you may rack up a hefty tab. Their happy hour happens daily with a wide array of wines to choose from!

Libertad 1161. Subte: Line C – San Martín. Tel: +54 11 4811 1108. Hours: Mon 7pm-2am, Tue 7pm-2:30am, Wed 7pm-3am, Thu 7pm-3:30am, Fri 7pm- 4am, Sat 8pm-4am, Sun 8pm-2am. Web: www.granbardanzon.com.ar

Leitmotiv

 

A photo posted by Leitmotiv BA (@leitmotiv_ba) on

Popular with trendy young locals, this craft cocktail bar emits a relaxed cool atmosphere on all three of its levels. In warmer weather, their rooftop terrace is the perfect spot to unwind, complete with its own bar and great music from a rotating roster of local DJs. Or sit at the downstairs bar and watch the bartenders make each concoction with precision and flair, turning orange peels into edible sculptures or torching sugar to caramelize it to maximum effect. Equal attention is given to the food in the kitchen, which offers creative small and large plates. On Thursdays and Fridays, happy hour runs till 9 pm and features Cynar Julep’s, Garibaldi’s and Aperol Spirtz’s at a deal of 2 for 80 pesos!

Cabrera 5700. Subte: Line B – Dorrego. Tel: +54 11 4777 0743. Hours: Wed 8pm- 2am, Thu 8pm-2:30am, Fri 8pm-4am, Sat 9pm-4am. Web: www.leitmotiv-ba.com.ar

NOLA

 

A photo posted by NOLAba (@nolabuenosaires) on

Anyone craving Southern food need not look any further than NOLA, a Cajun gastro-pub with the best gumbo in town thanks to a New Orleans native running the kitchen. The ambiance is warm and casual, with indoor and outdoor seating and touches of the Big Easy throughout, like Café du Monde tins and Mardi Gras beads. Like any good American joint, they offer an early (for Argie standards) happy hour from 5-8pm – pints go for 50 pesos. New to NOLA? Go early and order the famed fried chicken + pint of Filidoro, a local craft beer made by the owners. Food portions are small though, so a real Yankee appetite might require two or three rounds.

Gorriti 4389. Subte: Line D – Scalabrini Ortiz. Tel: +54 11 6350 1704. Hours: Wed-Mon 5pm-midnight. Web: www.nolabuenosaires.com

Pony Line

 

A photo posted by juanicasasco (@juanicasasco) on

Designed as an homage to the sport of kings, this polo-themed lounge bar is casual yet sexy (read: lots of leather). With a large menu of creative house cocktails, mood lighting and plenty of pretty people watching, you won’t mind if your date shows up fashionably late. While you’re always given a gratis snack, if your appetite requires a larger bite, the food comes from one of the best kitchens in BA. Whether you’re staying upstairs at the Four Seasons or not, this is one hotel bar that should not be missed.

Posadas 1086/88. Tel: +54 11 4321-1200. Hours: Mon-Thu 11am-2am, Fri 11am-3am, Sat 6pm-3am, Sun 5pm-1am. Web: www.fourseasons.com/ buenosaires/dining/lounges/pony_line

 

For more info on the best places to eat and drink in BA, download your copy of Glutton Guide Buenos Aires: The Hungry Traveler’s Guidebook and start eating like a local.

Glutton Guide Buenos Aires Launches – Dulce De Leche for EVERYONE!

Want to experience the best there is to eat (and drink) in the land of parilla, helado and Malbec? Look no further than Glutton Guide Buenos Aires: The Hungry Traveler’s Guidebook.

Glutton Guide Buenos Aires coverGlutton Guide Buenos Aires is written by Caitlin McCann, a writer, phothttp://www.gluttonguides.com/product/buenosaires/ographer and blogger who moved to Buenos Aires in 2012, tasting everything the city had to offer. Fluent in Spanish and married to a porteño, Caitlin has an insider’s view of the local food scene.

“My love affair with Argentine cuisine began in college with my first bite into dulce de leche-filled alfajores. Now, with Glutton Guide, I’ve put together everything a visitor to BA will need to plan a memorable meal-based trip, highlighting the city’s most delicious foods,” Caitlin says. “Whether you’re looking for the best way to order your steak at a parilla or a how-to guide to survive a night of partying (the siesta is just the beginning), Glutton Guide will make sure you make the most of every bite in BA.”

Glutton Guide goes beyond simple restaurant listings by providing a comprehensive look at the city’s dining scene. The Buenos Aires edition covers everything from the best merienda spots in the city to local dining trends to can’t-miss food-related activities — plus everything in between, including the city’s best bars and handy translations to help readers navigate the dining scene.

Download your copy of Glutton Guide Buenos Aires: The Hungry Traveler’s Guidebook from our website or Amazon’s Kindle store and start eating like a local.